K02 Stono Ferry - 20 June 1779

Victory Results:
 0 %
Record a victory for BOTTOM ARMY  100 %
Total plays 1 - Last reported by ozzie on 2021-08-01 08:36:46

Historical Background

British General Augustine Prevost, after failing to capture Charleston in early May, retired to James Island and set up fortifications guarding Stono Ferry. The work finished, Prevost left for Savannah and shortly after his brother, who was then in command, also left for Savannah along with most of the garrison guarding the Ferry. The under-strength command fell to John Maitland. Informed of the weakened British positions, Continental General Benjamin Lincoln broke camp on June 19 and arrived at the Ferry after daylight on the 20th. Although Lincoln ordered his troops to hold their fire and assault with the bayonet, their advance halted after receiving fire from the British positions and degenerated into a fire-fight. The South Carolina militia, however, managed to push the Hessians back, but Maitland shifted troops to the left to reinforce the Hesians and the militia retired.
Lincoln, realizing that he could not force the position, ordered a retreat. Maitland immediately ordered the British to pursue. A Continental cavalry charge and a valiant stand by the Virginia militia held off the British long enough for Lincoln to extricate his army in fairly good order.

The stage is set. The battle lines are drawn and you are in command. The rest is history?

Battle Notes

Continental Army
• Commander: Benjamin Lincoln
• 5 Command Cards & 2 Combat Cards
• Move First

British Army
• Commander: John Maitland
• 5 Command Cards & 4 Combat Cards

Victory

5 Victory Banners

Special Rules

• Opening Cannonade rules are not in effect.
• The Continental player will gain 1 Temporary Victory Banner Objective at the start of the turn when a Continental unit occupies a field works hex.
• The Stono River is impassable

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That these are our grievances which we have thus laid before his majesty, with that freedom of language and sentiment which becomes a free people claiming their rights as derived from the laws of nature, and not as the gift of their chief magistrate. ~~~ Thomas Jefferson ~~~

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