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140 - Niergnies - 8 October 1918

1 1 1 1 1 Rating 20% (3 Votes)
 0 %
Record a victory for BOTTOM ARMY  100 %
Total plays 1 - Last reported by Decebalus on 2016-11-28 14:38:38

Historical background

Towards the end of the second battle of Cambrai, British Mark IV tanks of 12th Battalion confronted a number of German captured Mark IVs. Under orders to support the advance of the 63rd Division to capture the German trench line just west of Niergnies, the British tanks moved forward in the mud, smoke and fog. The Germans also were advancing in the same area and around 8:30 AM the tanks met. Each side assumed the enemy tanks were friendly and not until they came within 50 yards of one another did the German tankers realize their mistake and opened fire. The lead British tank was immediately knocked out and another damaged and set on fire.
The remaining British tanks, infantry and artillery all joined in the attack against the enemy tanks, which forced them to retire.

The stage is set, the battle lines are drawn, and you are in command. The rest is history.

 


Victory Medals: 6

  • 1 Medal for each soldier unit eliminated.
  • 2 Medals for each tank eliminated. Note, there are two Mark IV captured tanks fighting for the Germans. Place German captured tank markers on these captured tanks.
  • The British and German forces gain 1 Temporary Victory Medal at the start of their turn, when one or more units occupy any opposition trench hex.

Special Rules

  • British player does the No-Man’s-Land shelling roll.
  • The German tanks may not be targeted until the turn after a German tank unit engages in combat, or until a British unit is in an adjacent hex to any German tank.
  • Kickstarter - Bonus Scenario.
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Tags: Medals: 6, Exp#1 Tank!

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Random Quote

I saw them tie a soldier to a cartwheel with his arms outstretched as a punishment. I also knew of men who did themselves in. British soldiers weary of sitting in the trenches who cut their throats during leave. If order hadn't been maintained, they would have deserted. They were coerced. When you're in the army, you can't just do whatever you want. ~~~ Gaston Boudry, in the Belgian book 'Van den Grooten Oorlog' ~~~