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MD05 Talavera BT (28 July 1809)

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Record a victory for BOTTOM ARMY  50 %
Total plays 4 - Last reported by Bayernkini on 2012-07-21 00:00:00

Talavera (Breakthrough) - 28 July 1809

Historical Background
Sir Arthur Wellesley crossed into Spain and on July 20th joined with General Cuesta’s beaten Spanish Army to oppose two French armies under Soult and Victor. Hearing of the allied advance, Soult proposed that Victor attack to hold the British and Spanish armies while he marched south and placed his army between Wellesley and his base in Portugal. On the evening of 27th July, the British and Spanish were deployed around Talavera with the Spanish holding the strongest defensive terrain. A line of high ground, the Cerro de Medellin, formed the main position for the British troops.
Victor’s approaching army had been reinforced by a corps under Sebastiani and a large body of cavalry under King Jerome Bonaparte. Victor decided to assault the Cerro de Medellin without delay and ordered Ruffin’s Division to make a night attack. The French broke through the surprised British troops and one gallant regiment actually reached the crest before being driven off by reserves. Next morning, Ruffin’s division attacked again. As the infantry reached the crest of the hill, volleys from the waiting British caused fearful execution in Ruffin’s columns. The British then charged and drove the French back across Portina brook. There was a pause as the French leadership decided its next move. Joseph ordered Sebastiani to attack along with Ruffin’s depleted division. Meanwhile, Victor’s remaining infantry attempted to outflank the British line. Sebastiani and Ruffin were driven back while Wellesley countered the flanking move with cavalry. The French infantry formed square and drove the cavalry off with heavy loss. Joseph did not commit his last reserves. During the night he ordered the French army to retreat.
The stage is set. The battle lines are drawn and you are in command. Can you change history?

This scenario use the new GMT (expansion 5) card deck. Some cards, which has printed "Stars" use the "March Move" action as in the expansion 6 (epic extension) described.

Set-Up Order

Forest Hill Fieldworks 3 River RiverBend RiverBridge River Fork right River Fork 3 Town
15 28 2 8 15 2 1 1 3

Battle Notes

British Army
• Commander: Wellesley
• 6 Command Cards

Line Infantry Light Infantry Guard Grenadier Infantry Light Cavalry Foot Artillery Leader   Line Infantry Light Infantry Light Cavalry Heavy Cavalry Foot Artillery
4 1 1 3 2 4   1 1 2 1 1

French Army
• Commander: King Joseph Bonaparte, Marshal Jourdan, Marshal Victor and General Sebastiani
• 5 Command Cards
• Move First

Line Infantry Light Infantry Grenadier Infantry Light Cavalry Heavy Cavalry Foot Artillery Horse Artillery Leader
11 2 1 1 2 2 1 4

 

Victory
8 Banners

Special Rules
• The Targus River is impassable

• The River Portina Brook is fordable, will stop movement, but does not cause any battle restrictions.

Tags: Banners: 8, Army: Allies, Army: British, Army: French, Army: Portuguese, Unofficial, Special Rule: Breakthrough

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Oleg's Avatar
Oleg replied the topic: #365 6 years 5 months ago
This night tried Naps Breakthrough scenario for the first time.
It took over 3 hours but brought a lot of pleasure. With standart infantry one-hex move on 17 hex long map all manoevures becomes predictable as never before so players need patience and composure.
Anyway, the game was classic "rotate door" battle, where strong right flanks of both opponents advanced trying to crash enemies weaker left wings. I was quicker, so I won, final map was looking funny becouse front turned on 90 degrees with French to the right and Allies to the left. also I have to note that Allies possition in center is extremally hard to breake, so use flanks, my friends.

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In war, three-quarters turns on personal character and relations; the balance of manpower and materials counts only for the remaining quarter.~Napoleon