104 Espinosa de los Monteros (10-11 November 1808)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Rating 3.89 (9 Votes)
 49 %
Record a victory for BOTTOM ARMY  51 %
Total plays 94 - Last reported by Richards on 2022-07-04 05:51:44

Espinosa de los Monteros - 10/11 November 1808

Historical Background
After the escape from Zornoza, Blake’s army was still in trouble. Marshal Victor was pressing forward through the mountains and in position to cut off one of Blake’s divisions under the command of Pedro Caro, Conde de San Romana, but Blake halted his retreat and turned to join Romana at Espinosa. The 23,000 Spaniards occupied a strong position. Romana’s division, composed entirely of regular Spanish regiments, held the Spanish right flank. After defeating the Prussians in 1806, Napoleon demanded and received this division to garrison the Baltic coast area. Upon learning of Napoleon’s invasion of Spain, the entire division boarded Royal Navy ships and returned to Spain to fight. On the first day of battle, they repulsed General Villatte’s advance division of Victor’s corps. When Victor arrived later in the day with the rest of his corps, he launched a second attack on Romana’s division, but once again the French were driven back with heavy losses on both sides, including Romana himself, killed leading his troops.
Victor was no Napoleon, but he realized the day’s attacks had forced Blake to weaken his center and left to shore up Romana’s weakened division on the right. The following day Victor ordered Lapisse’s division to attack on the Spanish left at Las Peñucas ridge. It was a fortunate decision. General Acevedo’s division held this ground, but most of his troops were newly raised, inexperienced and untrained. After a short struggle, the Spanish left flank broke and fled. With Lapisse in firm control of the heights above Espinosa, Victor ordered a general advance and the Spanish army collapsed. After the battle over 8,000 Spaniards drifted away to return home rather than reform with Blake’s shattered army at Reinosa.
The stage is set. The battle lines are drawn and you are in command. Can you change history?

 

Set-Up Order

Forest 11
Hill 11
River 7
RiverBend 2
RiverEnd 1
Town 4

 

Battle Notes

Spanish Army
• Commander: Blake
• 5 Command Cards
• Optional 3 Tactician Cards

Line Infantry Light Infantry Grenadier Infantry Militia Infantry Light Cavalry Foot Artillery Leader
6 2 2 3 2 2 3

French Army
• Commander: Victor
• 5 Command Cards
• Optional 3 Tactician Cards
• Move First

Line Infantry Light Infantry Light Cavalry Foot Artillery Horse Artillery Leader
10 2 2 2 1 3

 

Victory
7 Banners

Special Rules
• Spanish Guerrilla Action Rule is in effect. The Spanish player starts with one Guerrilla counter.

• The River Trueba is impassable.

• The Shallow Stream is fordable.

Tags: Expansion 1, Banners: 7, Army: French, Army: Spanish, Special Rule: Guerrilla

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Richards's Avatar
Richards replied the topic: #7856 1 month 1 week ago
Turns 1 – 9: Spanish forces successfully beat back a French attack in the center but lose ground on their left and right flanks. Both sides spend numerous turns building up critical mass to throw against the other with the Spaniards being surprisingly aggressive. Spanish lead in the early turns, five to two.

Turn 10: General Ruffin has his voltigeurs on the far right open a devastating fire against the Spanish line. At the same moment, General Eugène-Casimir Villatte’s line troops charge into the woods against General Pedro Caro y Sureda, Marquis of La Romana’s Spanish light troops. Both Spanish regiments are reduced by around 50%. Meanwhile, in the center, General Pierre Belon Lapisse advances against General Joaquín Blake y Joyes’ line and causes a Spanish collapse. Blake is forced to flee to his Grenadier regiment. French Leadership was well played this turn. But the Spaniards are still ahead five to three.

Turn 11: The French continue to press the attack. The Spanish right flank crumbles and General Romana barely escapes to the high ground in front of the Trucha River. But in the center, General Blake encourages his Grenadiers forward and they route Lapisse’s forces. The Spanish hold the center, for the moment, and are very close to snatching victory. They lead six to five.

Turn 12: The French proceed with La Grande Manoeuvre and move up artillery and line troops west of the shallow stream along their right flank. General Acevedo recognizes the scheme and redeploys his infantry eastwards behind the ridgeline. Both sides favor defensive positioning this turn and the next.

Turn 14: Generals Ruffin and Villatte see the exposed Spanish right flank manned by Romana’s weakened light troops. With extraordinary Leadership, the French commanders concentrate fire on the high ground defended by the Spanish. The merciless volleys are accurate, the Spanish light regiment is destroyed and the brave General Romana is killed while ordering his men. With Romana’s death, the Spanish right flank is turned and the French win a close one seven to six after fourteen turns.
Mark-McG's Avatar
Mark-McG replied the topic: #7232 1 year 2 months ago
hoping that fixes two birds with one paste
Fencer's Avatar
Fencer replied the topic: #7231 1 year 2 months ago
There is an error on the top of the map. It says "1809", but it should be "1808"
LARS's Avatar
LARS replied the topic: #6903 1 year 7 months ago
uffin conducted a masterful attack on the Spanish right. Blake was carried from the field seriously wounded and his counterattack was annihilated by a rapid redeployment of guns and light cavalry. French win 7-2.
Mark-McG's Avatar
Mark-McG replied the topic: #6809 1 year 8 months ago
map is missing a unit, French LN in centre

Random Quote

There is no man more pusillanimous than I when I am planning a campaign. I purposely exaggerate all the dangers and all the calamities that the circumstances make possible. I am in a thoroughly painful state of agitation. This does not keep me from looking quite serene in front of my entourage; I am like an unmarried girl laboring with child. Once I have made up my mind, everything is forgotten except what leads to success.~Napoleon