Coming Out of Square

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8 years 7 months ago #702 by mavvim
Coming Out of Square was created by mavvim
My friend recently purchased C&C:N and we played it for the first time a few days ago, just the first two scenarios.

Here's the context for my question: a British infantry unit was attacked by French cavalry and formed square. The attack was fended-off and in his next turn the French player chose to send his cavalry to another part of the field. He then moved some French infantry in the direction of the British unit, although not close enough to actually attack that turn. In the British player's turn he wanted to change formation out of square so as to be ready if the French infantry attacked, but not actually move the unit.

Query: was an order required to change formation in this case? We understood that had the unit moved, then no additional order would have been required to change out of square, but what if the unit doesn't other wise move? It did not seem to make sense to use a valuable order to change formation in this instance. After all, in reality it would mostly have been the unit commander's decision to change formation, or, more specifically, to move in and out of square depending on what enemy troop types were nearby.

In the end it was agreed to allow the unit to come ouf of square in the British player's movement phase.

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8 years 7 months ago #703 by Freeloading-Phill

mavvim wrote: was an order required to change formation in this case? We understood that had the unit moved, then no additional order would have been required to change out of square, but what if the unit doesn't other wise move? It did not seem to make sense to use a valuable order to change formation in this instance. After all, in reality it would mostly have been the unit commander's decision to change formation, or, more specifically, to move in and out of square depending on what enemy troop types were nearby.


By the rules that was wrong.
A unit can only come out of square when it is given an order and there is no enemy cavalry adjacent.
It comes out of square in the order phase and may then move and battle normally.

It's maybe a little bow to the game system since local commanders only act offensively when given orders as well. Also if it cost nothing to come out of square then the game looses some of the tension in the decision to go into square in the first place as it becomes almost always the default thing to do.

The reality idea is a difficult one - maybe the unit commander has no idea if there is cavalry just over the hill until word comes from a commander with an overview of the battlefield as opposed to his local on the ground one. I'm no expert though. :unsure:

Phill

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6 years 4 months ago - 6 years 4 months ago #1622 by bartok
Replied by bartok on topic Coming Out of Square
then...with only one order, you can remove the "square marker" and your unit can just move and/or battle or stay and ranged battle as normal (always when there is no cavalry adjacent)?
Last edit: 6 years 4 months ago by bartok.

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6 years 4 months ago - 6 years 4 months ago #1623 by Bayernkini
Replied by Bayernkini on topic Coming Out of Square
Yes, if an unit come out of square, this unit is ordered normal.
The unit may move or not, may battle or not.

My dice are the hell!
Last edit: 6 years 4 months ago by Bayernkini.

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